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“You” - Does this Netflix Original glorify psychopaths?

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January 22, 2020 18:22

The Netflix Original show “You” depicts a psychopath stalker telling the narrative from his perspective. Throughout the series he chooses girls to stalk and uses the information he finds to make these girls fall in love with him. He obsesses to intensely that murder and deception are involved. We get to hear his thoughts throughout the entire process as well and realize that he thinks he can still become a “normal person” through love, which he claims to have for these women. The protagonist Joe Golberg does not believe that he stalks and kills on purpose. He makes up excuses for them and usually claims he does it for the women and that they would want him to do it. In reality he is just too afraid to face the demons inside him.


In season one we get a look inside his past and find out his father was abusive, which easily becomes an excuse for his behavior to viewers, or at least “reasons” it. In season two we actually discover how screwed up his mom was as well, adding to the reasons for his mental instability. Even though he isn’t portrayed in a glorifying manner, sometimes the show provokes sympathy in the viewer for a psychopath killer. This is not the only show that makes you “root for the bad guy”. Shows before “You” like “Dexter” and “Breaking Bad” make you want the protagonist to get his way, which often times involves murder. However, personally I always at some point find myself hoping they figure it out and essentially become a healthy and stable person which never happens, hence the 8 seasons of Dexter. But do these shows glorify their behavior? And why do we like watching people suffer through illnesses like this?

Since the beginning of movies we’ve watched villians on screen who don’t always lose like in the traditional superhero movies. They try to give us a glimpse of what lies behind their illnesses and give us hope for change just to prove that they will never change. In many cases these illnesses are misportrayed and movie creators love to make up symptoms. Whether we watch them to get away from our crazy lives or just because we enjoy crime, murder and punishment shows they are undeniably intriguing.

I personally did not enjoy the camera work and effects used for the show “You”. It was often times unnecessarily blurry and up close to avoid showing that some of the actors just can’t act that well. It has somewhat of a soap opera aspect in the overdramatic reactions, crazy situations and drastic story changing plot twists. However, I did watch both seasons so they must have done something right. I do have to admit that the show is very capturing and sometimes I don’t mind watching a show that’s basically an overly dramatic generation z drama thriller soap opera. It’s a nice switch up from the usual upbeat “everything always works out perfectly” type tv shows.

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The employees in the boutiques, in the design studio and in the backstage area at fashion shows wear white lab coats, as was common in the ateliers of the great couturiers, e.g. Christian Dior, and is still common today. The fashion shows for the high-priced fashion sometimes took place in the context of the Paris Prêt-à-porter shows in unconventional locations, up to shabby surroundings (construction site, metro station, dining room of the Salvation Army etc.). The boutiques are kept in plain white and gray. Margiela originally selected unspectacular locations such as a residential area in Tokyo and did not publish the addresses of the boutiques in order to require the customer to make an effort to find the store at all. The first Margiela store opened in Tokyo in 2000 and the first European boutique was inaugurated in Brussels in 2002. In 2008, a boutique opened in a basement on the edge of Munich's Maximilianstrasse. This was followed by participation in numerous exhibitions, including "Radical Fashion", which was shown in 2001 at the V&A Museum in London. In 2010 there were 36 own stores worldwide.  In 2015 there were over 50 stores worldwide, including boutiques, that only carry the MM6 collection.

The company followed a very restrictive communication policy. The designer can neither be photographed nor interviewed. Only his creations should speak for themselves and the designs should be perceived as the overall performance of the team. That's why the team always shows up in white doctor's coats after the fashion shows - nobody should stand out.

By recycling old fashion, separating, recoloring, reversing seams and zippers, both the origin and the artificial of the art of tailoring are shown. Margiela puts together what doesn't belong together: by hand, jeans turn into skirts, old army socks become pullovers. Baptized by the press as deconstructivism, this current is defined by an abrupt collision of different materials, which at first glance appear inharmonic in the sense of conventional viewing habits. Margiela herself rejects the term "deconstructivism". He resurrected clothes in a new form, he told ELLE in 1991.

Margiela was the unofficial 7th member of "Antwerp 6", a generation of fashion designers who all completed their training at the Royal Academy of Arts between 1980-1981 and shaped the "style of the Belgians". However, it does not belong to the actual group, but it became known in a similar period.

The Japanese "Street Magazine" dedicated two special editions to "Maison Martin Margiela", which were published in book form in 1999. Nicolas Ghesquière (Balenciaga) is a big fan of Maison Martin Margiela.

In July 2014, fashion critic Suzy Menkes exposed Matthieu Blazy via Instagram as Head of Design, after which he deleted his Instagram account and changed his profile in a career network. He left the company on October 1, 2014.

To this day, Margiela pieces, especially in the fashion industry and all fashion lovers, belong to the sanctuaries in every repertoire and archive. Getting vintage pieces from other designers may be possible, but Maison Martin Marginal Archives are a real hunt and that says it all about this art.

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